Kitten care: How to help stop cat travel sickness

Posted by Nurse Whiskers. November 26th 2015.

If you occasionally take journeys with your cat or kitten in the car or by bus, you might notice he or she does not travel well.

Cat travel sickness or motion sickness is not uncommon. It’s nothing to worry about but it’s not too pleasant either.

Symptoms can include vomiting, excessive drooling and urinating.

Your cat might cry out in distress or seemingly freeze on the spot – refusing to move when the journey is over.

Many cats feel insecure when taken out of their normal environment. For some, the distress might be related to a bad travel experience earlier in life.

However, there are a few tips you can try to make journeys more comfortable.

 

Car journeys are not popular with all cats

Time and training

Solving the problem may be as simple as getting your cat used to travelling. Consider taking him or her out when you make short car journeys when you know you are not going to be leaving the car for long.

If you do this, say, once a week, you may notice your cat gets used to the idea and, next time a longer journey is required, will not display signs of distress.

Medication

Always talk to your vet before giving your pet any medication.

There are some types of medication, such as antihistamines, that should calm your pet during travel. They might also reduce the drooling and tendency to vomit.

There are other over-the-counter drugs such as meclizine and dimenhydrinate that are non-drowsy but should help curb nausea.

 

Your cats may not always enjoy being taken on a journey

Natural remedy

Some cat owners swear by ginger as a natural method of reducing nausea. It’s available in pill form or in biscuits and it is claimed that it will help unsettled stomachs.

Try giving your cat ginger about half an hour before you are due to travel.

Travel in comfort

The solution might be as simple as making the journey as comfortable as possible for your cat.

Make sure the temperature in the car is right. Perhaps opening a window slightly to let in some fresh air might help.

Take along a small toy so that your cat has something to play with until you arrive at your destination.

Try to avoid feeding your cat a couple of hours before making a journey.

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